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Male Mental Health and the Military: Dr Richard Magtengaard's Account

Male Mental Health and the Military: Dr Richard Magtengaard's Account

Written by Lauren Mason Nov 18, 2020

Military personnel are at a higher risk than the general population of developing mental health issues such as PTSD, depression, anxiety, alcohol and other drugs. Dr Richard Magtengaard understands the reality of this statement more than most. Richard spent 10 years as a Royal Australian Navy Commissioned Officer in bridge watchkeeping and navigation duties, before retiring to complete his Postgraduate Degree within Medicine (MBBS). Richard has several relatives who served with the ADF and Police, so you could say the Defence Force and military life are in his blood.

Since pursuing a career in psychiatry, Richard has become passionate about building meaningful connections with Veterans and their families to better meet the needs of the Defence Force community. A career in Defence can be accompanied with increased risk of mental health difficulties which are thought to stem from factors such as spending long periods away from family and friends. Richard now dedicates his work life to assisting our Defence personnel, Veterans and First Responders who have sustained physical and psychological traumas during duty.

“As a Veteran-specific private psychiatrist, I provide assessment and treatment for those experiencing mental health issues in their lives across a broad range of disabling conditions.”

As the current director of a Military Trauma Recovery Programme and a founder of the digital wellbeing platform Oqea, Richard prefers to provide support to Veterans and their families through a variety of different mediums, including telehealth and video conferencing. He strongly believes fast and easy access to support is a critical component of improving mental health outcomes for all.

“As a man it is sometimes difficult to talk about your emotions. My patients find accessing support through telehealth from the privacy of their own home to be a convenient way of gaining care they otherwise may not have sought out in person”.

Men’s health is in crisis and has been for some time now. Of the 65,000 Australians that attempt to take their lives each year 75% are male[1]. Whilst mental health is a large issue for society affecting men, women and children, there is a disproportionate number of males that experience mental health struggles.

When asked what kind of advice he’d offer men about their mental health Richard shared: “Remember whilst everyday may not be a good day, there is good in every day. You are not alone – be active, aware, connect, give and keep learning.”

That’s why Richard and the Oqea team are so passionate about raising awareness and funds for male mental health. Your donation could help save a father, brother or husband, a man’s life. Donate now at https://au.movember.com/team/2394146.


[1] https://www.lifeline.org.au/resources/data-and-statistics/

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Male Mental Health and the Military: Dr Richard Magtengaard's Account

Military personnel are at a higher risk than the general population of developing mental health issues such as PTSD, depression, anxiety, alcohol and other drugs. Dr Richard Magtengaard understands the reality of this statement more than most. Richard spent 10 years as a Royal Australian Navy Commissioned Officer in bridge watchkeeping and navigation duties, before retiring to complete his Postgraduate Degree within Medicine (MBBS). Richard has several relatives who served with the ADF and Police, so you could say the Defence Force and military life are in his blood.

Since pursuing a career in psychiatry, Richard has become passionate about building meaningful connections with Veterans and their families to better meet the needs of the Defence Force community. A career in Defence can be accompanied with increased risk of mental health difficulties which are thought to stem from factors such as spending long periods away from family and friends. Richard now dedicates his work life to assisting our Defence personnel, Veterans and First Responders who have sustained physical and psychological traumas during duty.

“As a Veteran-specific private psychiatrist, I provide assessment and treatment for those experiencing mental health issues in their lives across a broad range of disabling conditions.”

As the current director of a Military Trauma Recovery Programme and a founder of the digital wellbeing platform Oqea, Richard prefers to provide support to Veterans and their families through a variety of different mediums, including telehealth and video conferencing. He strongly believes fast and easy access to support is a critical component of improving mental health outcomes for all.

“As a man it is sometimes difficult to talk about your emotions. My patients find accessing support through telehealth from the privacy of their own home to be a convenient way of gaining care they otherwise may not have sought out in person”.

Men’s health is in crisis and has been for some time now. Of the 65,000 Australians that attempt to take their lives each year 75% are male[1]. Whilst mental health is a large issue for society affecting men, women and children, there is a disproportionate number of males that experience mental health struggles.

When asked what kind of advice he’d offer men about their mental health Richard shared: “Remember whilst everyday may not be a good day, there is good in every day. You are not alone – be active, aware, connect, give and keep learning.”

That’s why Richard and the Oqea team are so passionate about raising awareness and funds for male mental health. Your donation could help save a father, brother or husband, a man’s life. Donate now at https://au.movember.com/team/2394146.


[1] https://www.lifeline.org.au/resources/data-and-statistics/